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Portraits: Lookalikes

Wednesday, January 25, 1984–Saturday, February 18, 1984

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Artists: Mary Ahrendt, Mimi Gross, Jodee Hartney, Michael Hurson, Michael Kenny, Vera Klement, Linda Lee, and Arnaldo Roche Rabell

Portraits, ranging from the Mona Lisa to Andy Warhol ’s Marilyn Monroe, can serve many functions. They can illustrate artistic technique and virtuosity, comment on contemporary society and, last but not least, represent and immortalize the appearance of specific individuals. With some of these functions in mind, curator Laurel Bradley organized Portraits: Lookalikes, an assemblage of works relating to portraiture in several media by eight artists. The exhibition helped forge links between the Director, a newcomer to Chicago, the new Gallery 400 and Chicago artists and dealers. Bradley ’s selection of paintings, drawings, photographs, and reliefs explored formal, technical and personal issues through the personal confrontation inherent in the portrait.

The artists featured in Portraits: Lookalikes – Mary Ahrendt, Mimi Gross, Jodee Hartney, Michael Hurson, Michael Kenny, Vera Klement, Linda Lee, and Arnaldo Roche Rabell – all use the portrait format. Necessarily, these paintings, drawings, photographs, and reliefs emphasize the figure and stress a direct encounter between artist and subject, viewer and art object. These works are not necessarily traditional portraits, which aim primarily at likeness. Rather, they adopt the portrait’s intense focus on a single human being as a means of exploring specific formal, technical, personal and humanistic issues.

Portraits: Lookalikes brings together a well-established Chicago painter (Vera Klement), an artist who spent long periods in Chicago but later moved to New York (Michael Hurson), a UIC alumnus then gaining considerable recognition (Mary Ahrendt), a New York artist who showed in Chicago (Mimi Gross), and four other young artists who offered provocative variations on the Portraits: Lookalikes theme (Jodee Hartney, Michael Kenny, Linda Lee, Arnaldo Roche Rabell).

Curated by Laurel Bradley
Portraits: Lookalikes

Gallery 400
Chicago, IL
January 25–February 18, 1984

The University of Illinois at Chicago (UlC) will explore the dimensions of a personal confrontation — the portrait — in a free exhibit beginning January 25.

Portraits: Lookalikes offers the work of eight artists selected by Laurel Bradley, director of UlC’s Gallery 400, from January 25 through February 18. The show is open to the public from noon to 5pm, Tuesdays through Saturdays in the Gallery 400 of the College of Architecture, Art and Urban Planning. The gallery is located at the southwest corner of Peoria and Van Buren streets.

An opening reception will be held from 5 to 7 pm, January 25 in the gallery. Bradley ’s selections directly link artist, subject, viewer and the art object itself in both traditional and non-traditional ways. Her choice of paintings, drawings, photographs, and reliefs explores formal, technical and personal issues.

The portraits include paintings by Chicagoan Vera Klement; drawings by Michael Hurson and reliefs by Mimi Gross. New York residents who have spent long periods in
Chicago; mixed media work by UIC alumna Mary Ahrendt; photographs by young Chicago artists Jodee Hartney and Michael Kenny and paintings by two other young Chicagoans, Linda Lee and Arnaldo Roche Rabell.

The exhibit is supported by an Illinois Arts Council grant.

EXHIBITION SUPPORT

Portraits: Lookalikes is supported by the University of Illinois at Chicago School of Art and Design’s College of Architecture, Art and Urban Planning. This exhibition is also funded by a grant from the Illinois Arts Council.

EXHIBITION CHECKLIST

Mary Ahrendt

Portrait (blue), 1981
Type-C print, 90 x 30 in.

Self-Portrait, 1983
Cibachrome with dry color, 80 x 40 in.

Mimi Gross

Soldiers, 1980
Ceramic, eight pieces, dimensions vary

Jodee Hartney
Andy Somma, 1983
Gelatin silver print, 16 x 20 in.

Angela Kelly, 1983
Gelatin silver print, 16 x 20 in.

Katherine and Leonard, 1983
Gelatin silver print, 16 x 20 in.

Laura Nicholson, 1983
Gelatin silver print, 16 x 20 in.

Miles Decoster, 1983
Gelatin silver print, 16 x 20 in.

Peter Keenan, 1983
Gelatin silver print, 16 x 20 in.

Michael Hurson

Portrait of Ron Stone, 1980
Pastel, gouache, and paper, 24 x 14 in.

Portrait of Sandra Eisenberg, 1980
Pastel, gouache, and paper, 24 x 14 in.

Study for Portrait: Delia Ratner, 1979
China marker and acetate, 39 x 25 in.

Michael P. Kenny

Untitled x 6, 1982 – 83
Six photographs, each 18 x 19 in.

Vera Klement

Man at Window, 1966
Oil on canvas, 68 x 50 in.

Man with a Beard, 1981
Oil on canvas, 6 x 4 ft.

Self- Portrait, 1981
Encaustic and oil, 6 x 4 in.

Linda Lee

Gerald Stano: May have killed as many as 39 women
, 1984
Oil on canvas, 30 x 34 in.

Henry T. Moore, 54, is charged in Friday’s slaying of Judge Henry Gintale, 1984
Oil on canvas, 30 x 34 in.

Jack Henry Abbott, originally jailed for writing a check with insufficient funds, 1984
Oil on canvas, 30 x 34 in.

John Wayne Gacy: Convicted of Killing 33 Young Men and Boys, 1984
Oil on canvas, 30 x 34 in.

Arnaldo Roche Rabell

Burning of the Spirit of the Flesh, 1981
Mixed-media on paper, 45 x 36 in.

Scheme of Protection, 1981
Paper on plywood, 48 x 36 in.

Spirit of the Titan, 1983
Oil on canvas, 78 x 88 in.

ImagesLaurel Bradley is the founding director of Gallery 400 at the University of Illinois at Chicago. New to Chicago, Bradley has used her experience to forge links with Gallery 400 and Chicago artists and dealers. She earned a BA in art history from the University of Oregon, and a PhD from New York University ’s Institute of Fine Arts, for which she wrote a dissertation on Victorian art.

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